Preston Xaverian News: 26th May 2019

Here in Preston things have been quite busy. Last Saturday (18/05) there was a day exploring “Being Church in Smaller Groups” as part of the Formation for Mission agenda of the ACTA Group. Facilitated by Rose and Greg McCrave, the day gave the 40 or so participants a chance to identify and celebrate where we can be Church in smaller group settings. It was a very life giving and enthusiastic time together and we look forward to the next day on July 13th, where we will be aided by Simon Stewart to look at the Emerging Church.

On September 14th we will have a day organised by the Xaverians where we will present the Xaverian Charism, explore together how to live the mission spirituality and make the Xaverian Centre here a place of formation and nourishment, but also one of outreach. Come and take part and see how we can put in practice our aims of interfaith dialogue, lay formation and mission on the margins by cultivating a mission spirituality.

This week Jim will be in Rome with Hugh Foy, our director of projects and programmes, taking part in a Conference at the Gregorian University on “Cultures of Unbelief.” This is part of our commitment to interfaith, interreligious dialogue. We will keep you posted on how it went.

On July 1st we welcome Phil Callaghan who will work with us here in Preston. Phil is a young lay man who has great experience in youth and lay formation and was the Chair of the YCW in the UK. He will help in both administration but also in creating and delivering programmes. We are excited to have him on board.

We wish to thank all who continue to put on events and courses here at the Centre and to all who work behind the scenes in collaboration with us. Please keep abreast of all that’s going on via the web site or by contacting the Centre.

God bless

Jim Clarke, s.x.

Reflection on 6th Sunday of Easter: 26th May 2019

The Holy Spirit will remind you of all I have told you.

 Jesus said these words to his apostles at a time of transition in their lives, at a time when they must have felt that all their dreams were about to be shattered, that everything that mattered to them was about to be lost.

One of our greatest fears, and the cause of so much resistance to change, is that we think that we are on the verge of losing irrevocably what we have valued from the past. Don’t be afraid that in letting go you are losing anything at all, because everything that matters, from all the experiences and encounters in your life, has been internalised and is firmly lodged in your heart. It is yours. It is part of you. It travels with you and can never be lost. It will continue to enrich you. Walk on with empty hands so that you will be able to receive the gifts that are still to be given to you.

We internalise what matters. When we realise this, we find a new freedom to move forward. We internalise what matters. We can safely let go of what doesn’t matter, just as our own bodies absorb all that is good and life-giving from what we feed them and let go of the waste.

When we are in transition, we cling to small tokens that remind us of the past. Holding that cherished item may be an excuse to wallow in regret for what has been lost. Or it may be a gentle reminder that all those memories have become part of who we are now and we have every reason to revisit them with gratitude but no reason to let them swallow us up in fantasies about how the grass was always greener in the field we left behind.

Margaret Silf. The Other side of Chaos

“The Holy Spirit will remind you of all that I have told you.”  A definition of remind is ‘to awaken memories of something’ God speaks to us in so many ways: in the words of Scripture, in the people we meet every day, in the circumstances of our lives, in the places we have visited and in the wonders of Nature. Let us allow the Holy Spirit to awaken in us the many treasured memories which we have internalised and which nourish us and remind us of who we are. When holding these life-giving memories, may we feel more fully alive in the present moment, more hopeful for the future and may we experience true peace. “Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you.”

Dementia Singing Group starts 4th June 2019

Come to our new singing group if you or your partner suffer from Dementia.

As well as being good fun singing is recognised as being hugely beneficial for well-being as it can impact positively on our physical, emotional and social health.

Music and Singing offer a unique and important way for people with Dementia to communicate with others and to continue to feel connected and valued. The carer, wife husband or partner attending the group will feel extra support from the other group members who are in the same situation as them.

Sessions start each Tuesday at 10.00am for a cup of tea or coffee and a biscuits before singing. We aim to finish by noon.

There is ample parking at the centre, wheelchair access and disabled toilets.

If you want more information then you can either call Alan directly on 01772 717122 or why not send him an email by using the form here.

If you know anybody who would like to join us let us know.

The Surprise of the Gospel

News just in of a joint venture between Lancaster, Liverpool and Salford Diocese supported by Bishop Paul. Fr Hugh Pollock from Kendal is one of the speakers. It is on the feast day of St Peter and Paul on 29th June. See poster for details.

Reflection on 5th Sunday of Easter: 19th May 2019

“Love one another just as I have loved you.”

Surely Jesus’ command to love one another was nothing new for the disciples and those of their time. The commandment is well known in the Old Testament: Love God with your whole heart and your neighbour as yourself.’ So what is new?  — “Love as I have loved you.” This is how we are to love. Love is not what we do, it is how we do it.

When we reflect on the words ‘…as I have loved you’, what are our thought processes?  Do we look for various Scripture references which speak of God’s love for us and in them find a God who loves unconditionally, a God whose love is indiscriminate: a God who is loving, caring, forgiving, compassionate, understanding and self-sacrificing. We find so many qualities of love for us to emulate. We are constantly looking for ways in which we can do this, ways in which we can show that we love as Jesus loved. Do we have the correct starting point? We are familiar with the story of the traveller who stopped to ask someone the directions to his destination. “If I were you, I wouldn’t start from here,” was the reply. Jesus’ starting point was his awareness that “I am in the Father and the Father is in me.” (John 14:11)

How we embark on our journey of loving others is rooted in our personal experience of who we are. Love is not something we decide to do now and then. Love is who we are.  We are created in the image of God and God is love. We were created by a loving God to be love in the world. When we get the “who” right and realise that who I am is love, then we will do what we came to do: Love God and love all that God has created. It is not really what we do that matters. It is the energy we do it with. We can tell immediately if there is love energy coming from the person we are with.  When we truly experience God who is Love, when we know that our heart keeps beating with His energy, then we become Love. We also know this to be true of others as well as ourselves. “To love another person is to see the face of God.” (Les Miserables)

Various sources

More new calendar entries

We are favoured with more calendar updates, this time for the Preston Men’s Group who, for the rest of 2019, will be meeting on the 1st Saturday of each month with the exception of August when they take a holiday break.

You can find more about the Group here.

Greg McCrave and Stephen Hoyland are leading a themed weekend retreat at St Beuno’s entitled “Finding Prayer in all Things” See here for details. Friday 5th – Sunday 7th Jul 2019

Something New For Women of All Ages

Rose McCrave asks if you would be interested in coming along to chat about starting a women’s prayer group monthly on a Wednesday from 2-3pm at the Xaverian Missionary Spirituality Centre.

If you are interested then please come along on Wednesday 12th June 2019 at 2pm to discuss the idea. If you can’t make it please feel free to contact Rose by email using the form here or call her on 07866 736067

Reflection on 4th Sunday of Easter: 12th May 2019

Eternal Life

The verses that follow today’s reading tell us that Jesus’Jewish opponents picked up stones to stone him, not for “any good work, but for blasphemy, because you, a mere man, claim to be God.” Jesus answered them, “Is it not written in your Law, ‘I have said you are “gods”’? [Psalm 82:6] If he called you ‘gods,’ to whom the word of God came—and Scripture cannot be wrong—then why then do you accuse me of blasphemy because I say that I am the son of God?’

The Jews did not know Jesus. They were not ready or willing to believe that what God has done in Jesus, he has done everywhere: putting together human and divine. In today’s first reading, Paul and Barnabas also met with a similar resistance from the Jews when they preached the good news. “Since you reject it and judge yourselves to be unworthy of eternal life, we are now turning to the Gentiles.” When the Gentiles (the outsiders) heard this, “as many as had been destined for eternal life became believers.” For the Jews it was all too much to believe, just as it is for us. We are a creation of God from all eternity. Our DNA is divine yet we are born in human form. How can we believe this when there is so much evidence to the contrary? We are so aware of our limitedness. How can we be sons and daughters of God? Yet that is the assertion that Jesus makes and he says that we are to follow him in believing this.

To follow Jesus is to know who we objectively are from all eternity, to know that we are created with the same personhood, the same identity, the same combination of divinity and humanity as he was. Nobody achieves this to perfection. It’s not a question of being perfect. It’s a question of our deepest core identity. We are created in God, by God and for God. The main difference between Jesus and the rest of us is that Jesus believed it and most of us don’t. He knew, he trusted and allowed himself to be God’s Son. Let’s allow our daughterhood, our sonship to be a daily choice; to daily allow and surrender to this glorious good news of who we objectively are in God from all eternity. This is the eternal life experienced by those who hear the voice of Jesus and follow him.

Richard Rohr (adapted): Homilies